the north face coat Irma downgraded to a tropical storm

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI (WLOX) The National Hurricane Center forecast track has Irma moving into north central Alabama by Tuesday morning, then becoming a remnant low over Tennessee by Wednesday.Good news! Irma is now downgraded to a Tropical Storm. Still no threat to south MS.What we can expect are breezy north winds to develop and stick around through Wednesday. Generally, 15 20 mph with higher gusts. Because south Mississippi will be on the left side of the center of circulation, the winds will come from over land. That means we will not see an endless fetch of moisture from over the ocean like on the right side, limiting our chance for heavy rain and storms.One Minute Irma Update 7 AM 9 11 17Could a rain band pass through? Sure. Will it be anything severe? Not likely.Seas will be rough to choppy for the next few days and those shorelines that face north and east could see tides 1 2 feet higher than normal.Proposed plan would extend Beatline Road to Hwy 90Proposed plan would extend Beatline Road to Hwy 90Updated: Monday,
the north face etip gloves Irma downgraded to a tropical storm
March 12 2018 12:25 PM EDT2018 03 12 16:25:07 GMTA plan in its infancy is starting to get some traction in Harrison County to extend Beatline Road all the way south over the railroad tracks in Long Beach to Highway 90. (Photo source: WLOX)A plan in its infancy is starting to get some traction in Harrison County to extend Beatline Road all the way south over the railroad tracks in Long Beach to Highway 90.A plan in its infancy is starting to get some traction in Harrison County to extend Beatline Road all the way south over the railroad tracks in Long Beach to Highway 90.More than 4,000 Mississippi soldiers leaving home for a yearMore than 4,000 Mississippi soldiers leaving home for a yearPosted: Monday, March 12 2018 12:20 PM EDT2018 03 12 16:20:53 GMT(Photo Source: WLOX News)More than 4,000 Mississippi National Guard soldiers are leaving their homes this month as part of a year long deployment.More than 4,000 Mississippi National Guard soldiers are leaving their homes this month as part of a year long deployment.
the north face etip gloves Irma downgraded to a tropical storm

the north face recon Irishman Walking Stage 1 Chapter 5

Irishman Walking is about my walking the coastal roads of Japan through a series of summer, winter, spring, and autumn stages. Stage 1 began in Cape Soya in Hokkaido in the summer of 2009, and ended in Noshiro City in Akita Prefecture seven weeks later. This summer (2012), Stage 8 started at Shibushi Port in Kagoshima Prefecture on the southern island of Kyushu, and ended in the city of Fukuoka six weeks after setting off. Stage 9 is planned to start from Fukuoka City this winter and will end at Hiroshima in January 2013. The stage is planned to last for five weeks.

Cloudburst and steady downpour now

23 July, 2009: It rained hard on and off through much of the night. Which was not so strange I suppose, considering how unlucky I was with the weather since setting out from Tokyo. When I did bed down in the evening the rain and cold evening air left me in little mood for my customary two or three small glasses, or plastic cups to be precise, of red wine. One drop seemed to be enough before the weariness began to play its cunning tricks on my mind and body. As usual when alcohol passed my lips, I would awake in the early hours with the intention of taking my customary leek. The rain was still beating down rather heavily on my canvas castle, pitched on a campsite in Enbetsu. In order to perform any sense of relief, without getting overly wet by the rain, a rather dexterous position needed to be performed, that even a Chinese gymnast would have been proud to master. This meant keeping the upper and lower halves of my body inside the tent, while the middle part of my body was extended out into the cold night air and pouring rain. Finally the deed was satisfactorily performed! Fortunately for me, and the interior of my tent, too no doubt, the wind was in my favor. Contented that the deed had been performed as well as could be expected, Percy (penis) was tucked back into my shorts. Then with the tent flaps zipped up once more leaving the rain where it belonged, outside in the early morning chill, soon I was back in the warm comforts of my sleeping bag sound asleep.

By morning the area at large was saturated. The rain had stopped a couple of hours earlier, and now was replaced by a strong dry wind blowing in from the sea. Although the wind was getting up steam, still, I knew that I could not wait around for it to work miracles on my equally saturated clothes. They had been that way crammed into my backpack for much of yesterday. It was around eight in the morning when I saw the campsite office open up. Though the open door I could see two young men sit chatting away. Perhaps they were talking about what needed to be done about the place. Sometimes they glanced across the grassy well kept grounds as they talked, with the odd stare in my direction.

yen was the going rate for pitching a tent on the grounds, which was much cheaper than any of the campsites that I had previously stopped at on the island of Honshu. The problem that arose, however, I wanted a receipt for my own personal files. Perhaps they might have thought I was trying to get out of paying the yen fee. Nothing could be further from the truth! For what it was worth to the future of the Japanese campsite industry, I was more than willing to pay the stipulated cost.

The heavier of the two attendants told me that the campsite was not the place to issue receipts, and the main office was where campers should go to first . was in that large white building on the rise overlooking Route 232 he said pointing in that direction. I knew the building he was talking about, and had passed it last night. It was quite an imposing looking building just to the left of the road in the opposite direction to the campsite. would have thought it was there that I had to go to, to register to camp? I thought feeling a little stupid. Even if I had known, I would have been too tired last night to bother. Even now it was quite a climb up the winding road to do so, and nearly a kilometer back from whence I had come. Troublesome! Soon he was on the phone to someone at he main office asking what he should do about the receipt I wanted. Margaret Thatcher statement a couple of decades earlier: lady was not for turning was beginning to make sense to me.

All that I knew was that I did not want to backtrack even a quarter of a meter just to get a stupid receipt stipulating what, where and when yen was paid. Paid for stopping one lousy wet night on a campsite where even the facilities were closed to me, including the bug (toilet). A hot shower would have been more than appreciated. Besides, with an untold number of kilometers ahead of me, I felt strongly against any unjust wear and tear on my body. As luck had it, the same attendant was instructed to drive up to the main office in person to pick up the receipt. Not to make things any easier for him, I gave him a yen note in payment. I did not have anything less on me. All he had to do was to return with the receipt and my change in hand.

While he was gone, I set down at a round, plastic table outside, so as to look over my maps and to organize my thoughts for the day. As I was doing this, the thinner of the two attendants came out from the little office and gave me a can of ‘Georgia Emerald Mountain Blend Black coffee. I did not see him approach the table, or anything about me for that matter, as was my habit when engrossed in thought. Up until then I cared for nothing, but the lost minutes, and all for what? A stupid receipt! Too much time had been wasted already. Of course, I was very much grateful for the young fellow rather unexpected kind act, and told him so. Just prior to the little gift, I had started on my usual, if not pitiful, breakfast intake of some almond nuts and raisins. So as a counter to my empty water bottles, the coffee was a treat for which I felt truly grateful, even if it was not hot.

A look over the campsite and all the other similar places that I passed down along the coastal roads told me that the local governments had spent a lot of money to draw tourists. Even now the short burst of background music, the modern design and bright color of the buildings, and general layout of the campsite caused me to think way back to a certain summer holiday I had as a child in the mid 1960s. That was at a Butlin’s Holiday Camp in Ulster, long gone out of business. Butlin was a chain of large holiday camps in the United Kingdom and Ireland that provided affordable holidays for ordinary British families. Sir William Heygate Edmund Colborne “Billy” Butlin was a South Africa born entrepreneur whose name was synonymous for the low budget holiday camps. The Butlin brand name had enticed millions of families and young couples to its coastal camps since being founded in 1936. Together with its colorful, organized entertainment, redcoat and bluecoat smiles became a cultural phenomenon. I still recall adults talking about the notary comedian and redcoat, Jimmy Cricket, who was performing during the summer of 1966,when was there. How very similar everything here looked and sounded. All that was missing were the ever smiling Blue Coats and Read Coats, but unlike way back then, the campsites I stopped on or passed by were either empty or just empty. So too, the buildings and facilities had become rundown and faded.

With my receipt safely stored away for memories sake, I was underway by nine thirty. My short tramp by the seafront on a tiny road that belonged to the campsite, lead to a T junction. The left turn brought me up on to Route 232 after about thirty minutes or so. As I neared the road a sparrow landed on an iron fence and calls out in the way birds do. Was it trying to tell me something? I passed it by with out so much as a care. One thing I noticed about the crows was that they were nowhere near the size of the massive scavengers that hang about the local rubbish dumps in Tokyo.

Just yesterday when I was tramping by one of the many farms I came across I saw a dead crow hanging from a rope. It was some kind of deterrent device I supposed. “Could crows comprehend such a thing? I wondered. “Did such things work better than scarecrows, if at all?” I had read somewhere that crows were generally right handed, not that they really had hands. In Tokyo I once saw a couple of crows fighting over who should get first bite from the meat of one of their splattered counterparts. It was dead as doornail after being hit by a car. I was sitting on my motorbike at a traffic light then watching the two crows fighting for the honor. The lights changed and I had to leave without knowing how things turned out. I somehow thought that the hanging crow would not work as a deterrent.

That said I felt it really took a fairly steady wind to shift the dead bird hanging from the fence to produce any meaningful effect. On an added note, one scarecrow I passed was better dressed than me that I even thought of switching clothes with it. On a road in Tokyo I once saw a couple of crows fighting over which should get first peck of the splattered meat of one of their counterparts. The thing was as dead as a doornail after being hit by a car. I sat on my motorbike at a traffic light watching the two crows fighting for the honor. The lights changed and I had to leave without knowing how things turned out.

Last night just as I pitched my tent a tiny butterfly came and sat on top of a blade of grass nearby. A heavy rain that let up an hour earlier saturated the grassy field. Like the blade of grass upon which the tiny beauty set, the rain too beat down everything. I moved my index finger slowly and gently beside the butterfly to see what would happen. Without any hesitation, it staggered onboard and began to make its way up on to the back of my right hand and along my bare arm towards my shoulder. I could feel a tiny tickling sensation as it moved. I slowly raised my right arm and low and behold, the tiny beauty turned upwards towards my hand from which it came. I lower my arm, while slowly turning my hand. The butterfly made its way around and now stood on the back of my hand. Whether it felt comfortable in my presence I would never really know, but our little encounter could not have been better timed. Just then, the rain began to bucket down again, this time heavier than before. At the space between the inner and outer canvas of the tent I blew gently and the tiny creature fluttered away inside. At least there it would find some shelter from the rain for the night.

Looking out through the open tent flaps at the heavy rain, I could just about make out the figure of a cyclist. If the miserable weather was not enough, he certainly had his work cut out for him. The bicycle was heavily loaded up with camping gear, and was powering his way up a steep segment of road, which I had tramped up the night before. Not a word was spoken as he went by!
the north face blue kazoo Irishman Walking Stage 1 Chapter 5
“Perhaps he did not see me” I thought while at the same time wondering why I did not say something either. Just then a military truck passed, and I watched it disappear out of sight. It was not the last time I spotted a military truck that day, and suspected there was a military barracks somewhere in the vicinity.

By morning the rain had stopped falling, for the umpteenth time. When my tent was emptied and about to be dismantled and packed away, the butterfly made a guest appearance. It was just as well, since I had forgotten all abut the little thing. I watched it move from between the two canvases where I left it last night. And with a burst of energy following a good rest, it took off. Soon it returned and fluttered about for a bit before disappearing into the tent again. As was the case last night, I put out my finger and this time the tiny creature landed on it. Outside in the fresh morning air a gently wind blew against my cheeks, but the tiny creature held firm. Raising my left hand slowly to my lips, I blew gently on it, and so into the morning air it went. This time, we parted company for good! To paraphrase Shakespeare, is such sweet sorrow wind had left Route 232 fairly dry in no time. If only it had worked similar wonders on my clothes. There was not a sign or puddle anywhere of the heavy downpour last night. A little while ago a cyclist rode past me heading south. I had not seen or heard him coming, but for a brisk “Hi!” called out as he passed. It all seemed so quick that I had little time to react or reply for he was gone as quickly as he had come. I guess I was lost somewhere in my own world of thoughts, again. Some kilometers further on a motorcycle with sidecar passed. The rider waved and a pretty lady in the sidecar wearing dark glasses waved and smiled. I waved and smiled back at them. I loved large motorbikes and was the proud owner of one, currently parked at my place in Tokyo. Somehow a beautiful Harley with the sidecar gave a grand appearance, and with the beautiful women for a companion, the world was his oyster, I guess.

On the road, my companion was the Nihon Kai (Japan Sea) that warmed my heart every time I looked out over it. The majestic Musashi Kai, to be precise, was now with me for a good stretch of the Ororon Line the highway between the cities of Wakkanai and Otaru (Route 232). I could see two tiny islands away out on the horizon. In the absence of my map, I ventured to guess that the two islands were Yagishiri To and Teuri To, with just four kilometers of water separating them. Of the two islands, Teuri had the greater pull on tourism, with more accommodation and facilities to cater to them. The reason being were the thousands of sea birds migrating to the island, with others living and breeding there all year round. The Common Murre, or Ororon in Japanese, was perhaps the best known of birds on Teuri. Once Common Murre lived on the island in great numbers, but had been reduced to only a few because of nets from fishing boats. Actually, I could also make out the shape of a lone fisherman in his tiny fishing craft churning out a living. Still, I did not think it was the smaller fishing boats that were to blame. Squid fishing was the main thing in the area with large fishing boats from the southern islands used very powerful lights to attract the squid. In addition, there was not much grassland or forestland, but the scenery was said to be simply breathtaking. Not exactly a tourist attraction, but the “smallest high school in Japan” was also on Teuri Island, with ten teachers for just six students.

I set down for a rest or to ‘take the weight of the sling backs’, as an Australian friend might put it. As umpteen times before it was in one of the bus stop huts. The traffic on the road was picking up, as was the dust kicked up by it. For a while, too, it looked as though the sun would break through the clouds that had dominated the heavens since arriving in Hokkaido. The sweat ran down my face and back. I could feel the early stages of sunburn on the tips of my ears and nose. A rampage through the contents of my backpack produced the black rimmed ‘The North Face’ gore tex hat that I bought in the Ochanomizu district of Tokyo just before coming away, My old baseball cap with Guinness printed across the front was substituted to the sidelines for the time being.

For the umpteenth time, I stopped at a bus stop hut for a short rest, or to ‘take the weight of the sling backs’, as my Australian friends would put it. The traffic on the road was picking up, as was the dust kicked up by it. The dust caked sweat ran down my face. Also, I could feel the early stages of sunburn on the tips of my ears and nose. This puzzled me, for the lack of sunshine since starting some days ago. For a while it looked as though the sun would break through the clouds that had dominated the heavens since arriving in Hokkaido. A rampage through the contents of my backpack produced the black rimmed ‘The North Face’ gore tex hat that I bought in the Ochanomizu district of Tokyo just before coming away. My old baseball cap with Guinness printed across its front was substituted to the sidelines for the time being.

Just when I had finished strapping my backpack up again, a fat chap in his late sixties or seventies cycled by. He was clad in a bright colored green vest, a pair of faded white shorts, and sandals that had seen better days. The vest was rolled up high above his fat belly showing his bellybutton to any one how looked. The baggy shorts flapped madly about in the wind. Fastened to the rear of his bike were two well worn saddlebags; crudely covered with a black plastic rubbish bag to protect them from the rain. “Fighto” his broad smiling face called out as he passed. It would have been nice if he had stopped and exchanged a few words, or at least until I could have got a photo of him.

Even though we did not talk, the sight of the elderly cyclist had cheered me up for a while. But the happy thoughts soon vanished when I discovered that I had been misreading of my maps. Earlier this morning I anticipated having the sea with me for the greater part of the day. The direction Route 232 was to take me told a different story. Soon a series of punishing up hill and down hill curves lasted for more than ten kilometers. it! I thought. For even my maps could not to be trusted. Not only that, the winding segments along the road headed further and further inland, and soon not even the tiniest glimpse of the Nihon Kai could be seen. Earlier in the day, I was really beginning to feel at home on the road. With the sight and sound of the sea playing pleasant tricks on my mind, I felt so good. Of course I knew, also, that it was only a matter of time when the sea would be near again, but when? I hoped that the next time it happened there would be no more partings, but that too was impossible.

Up a head in the distance I could see a cluster of buildings. Perhaps it was a town! I still was not on friendly terms with my maps and was not sure of its name if it was a town. What the buildings harbored I was soon to find out, no doubt. A large blue and white colored road sign came into view. As I got near I could see the large lettering on it: ‘Romankaido Shosanbetsu’. (Roman Road). On the lower half of the sign I could see that an arrow pointed towards Shosanbetsu Spa and that Misakinoyu 2 kilometers further along the long straight road. A little further along a tiny sign told me that Teshio was 52 kilometers behind me. Another sign informed drivers that the maximum speed limit for drivers was 50 kilometers. There must have been a school nearby as a yellow and black sign advised drivers to be careful of children crossing. By the side of the road I could see some builders hard at work rebuilding or renovating a house. A few steps along the road I came to a wood factory. The grounds were neatly stacked with planks and logs of wood, old and recently cut down, all necessary to the building industry. the wood the workmen were using on the house came from there I thought as I passed by not really caring one way or another. suppose it made sense, in more ways than one, to have local workmen do the job. Again, I did not care much one way or another.

I am a somewhat disorganized yet, coherent, tidy, clean, healthy and happy Irishman with few regrets. travelled, worked, educated, born, and reborn, etc, etc, etc). In general, my views and outlooks on life are quite open minded and liberal. I have a very good sense of humor and love the company of similar minded people. I am also a lover of hiking, long distance cycling, camping and large (American style) motorbikes, to name a few of my interests. These are all the more worthwhile when done with someone you are comfortable with. Right? When I have free time I just love getting away from Tokyo (on my bicycle or on my motorbike) to some relaxing and interesting place.

If that is not possible, then I love to talk to friends. I honestly don’t know what friends say about me. I am sure they say so much, or at lea
the north face blue kazoo Irishman Walking Stage 1 Chapter 5

the north face.com Irish to wear Rockne era uniforms helmets vs Navy

The helmet with the stripping that comes down, the stitching that went into it it appears to be stitching,” Grooms explained. “Hydrographics did it for us out in Oregon. It’s a really unique look the detail that goes into this helmet that they put into it to make it resemble the artwork that we saw originally when we met with archives and the prints that we looked at to replicate it into a modern day technology is pretty cool.”

The helmets just arrived on Wednesday so Grooms and his crew are working hard to get facemasks on the helmets and have them ready. The players will wear the helmets on Friday to get the proper feel for them.

“It’s fun to see the players excited about the entire uniform the different uniform,
the north face hedgehog gtx xcr Irish to wear Rockne era uniforms helmets vs Navy
” Grooms said. “And the fans are finally coming around to accepting that we are going to wear something different each year.”

The players will even wear old school looking brown leather cleats.

“Not of us were alive when we wore this so it’s really cool to show them the pictures of what we used to have and how far it’s changed and how far we’ve come in technology and to be able to incorporate this look,” said Grooms.

As for why “Rockne” on the back of the jerseys when Notre Dame traditionally does not have any name on the back of the jersey outside of bowl games, Grooms said,
the north face hedgehog gtx xcr Irish to wear Rockne era uniforms helmets vs Navy
” full blown tribute.”

the north face stores Irish Immigrants Faced Hardship And Prejudice

It’s good to be Irish in Hartford today, on the feast of Ireland’s patron saint, and locate the green tie, say “Top o’ the mornin’ ” and perhaps stop for a pint at The Maple Cafe.

It wasn’t always thus. There was a time when the powers that be condemned St. Patrick’s Day celebrations and everything else about the Irish. The Irish were the first major immigrant group to settle in Connecticut, not counting the Puritan English who, when they saw the Irish coming, said, in effect: “There goes the neighborhood.”

The Irish began coming to the state in large numbers in the 1840s and 1850s to escape the great famines that ravaged their country. Those who survived the trip lived in awful slums and faced a wall of prejudice and bigotry that was uncannily similar to that faced by many subsequent immigrant groups that came to these shores. Day, a well to do Hartford lawyer and world class racist with no newspaper background, took over The Courant in 1855 and embraced the nativist Know Nothing movement that swept the state in that pre Civil War decade. “America for the Americans” was their battle cry, and for Mr. Day, “Irish American” was an oxymoron.

Everyone’s Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, the saying goes but in New England, we’re actually Irish all year long. Census Bureau. Learn About Tableau About 15.5.

Everyone’s Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, the saying goes but in New England, we’re actually Irish all year long. Census Bureau. Learn About Tableau About 15.5. (Stephen Busemeyer)

In editorial after editorial he savaged the Irish, only taking breaks to attack “the Negro, the Mongolian, the Malay or the Red American.” Neil Hogan, writing last year in The Shanachie, a publication of the Connecticut Irish American Historical Society, said The Courant in that period “maligned anything and everything Irish.”

Mr. Day warned of the dire consequences of allowing the Irish “ignorant, degraded and priest led foreigners” to vote. If the Irish took an interest in public affairs, soon “Irish Roman Catholics will be found in all our minor offices, and like the Irish police in New York,
the north face mcmurdo Irish Immigrants Faced Hardship And Prejudice
allow their countrymen the fullest liberty and never check them from crime.”

He also wrote, “Connecticut will no longer be called The Land of Steady Habits. The coarsest and most brutalizing passions will reign supreme, and drunkenness and riot fill the streets.”

Mr. Day blamed the Irish for bearing children that had to be raised in the Hartford Orphan Asylum and for filling the jails and almshouses, but also for driving down mechanics’ wages because “Irish are besieging the workshops, for work at less than living prices.”

Mr. Lincoln

Eventually, however, Mr. Day moderated his views. The Hartford Times, aligned with the Democrats, had savaged his rants as “vapid twaddle” and “driveling, puerile inanity,” former Courant news editor Joseph Nunes wrote last year.

Also, Mr. Day was deeply moved, as most in the room were, by Republican presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln’s anti slavery speech in Hartford in 1860.

Mr. Day would leave The Courant in 1864. In 1867, it merged with The Evening Press, creating a much stronger and more enlightened newspaper.

When it came to the Irish, Mr. Day was right about one thing: They did figure out how to use the ballot. An Irish ward, reliably Democratic, emerged in the 1850s. Gradually, the Irish worked their way into government and into civil service jobs. Also, the astounding valor of the Irish units in the Civil War, notably at Gettysburg and Fredericksburg, turned the phrase “Fighting Irish” from a negative to a positive. By the 20th century, many Irish American bylines could be found in The Courant.

Most Irish Americans are generations away from the immigrant experience, but a reflection on it should bring empathy for new arrivals. When you get here,
the north face mcmurdo Irish Immigrants Faced Hardship And Prejudice
it shouldn’t matter if your family was poor in Donegal or in Senegal.

the north face jester Ireland trip blends history

, and Irish countryside prove to be memorable vacation

A political mural decorates a building in a Catholic neighborhood of .(Photo: Photo by Marcia Jacobson)During a period in the 1980s, when I was working on a book on James Joyce’s “Ulysses” and, later, an edition of Joyce’s “The Dead,” I visited twice, but I had never been to other parts of Ireland. This was the first trip to Ireland for my wife, Marcia Jacobson.

Because Irish literature is one of the fields in which I teach and write, going to Ireland is special for me. I wanted to be there June 16, the day when “Ulysses” takes place; this day is now known as Bloomsday because a character named Leopold Bloom is the protagonist of “Ulysses.”

We began with seven days and six nights in the cities four nights in and two in before picking up our rental car in Galway and exploring the countryside. The trip was a history lesson that built on my studying not only Irish literature but also Irish history and culture.

It was a pleasure for us to be in Ireland in June during through the longest days of the year and to experience 18 to 19 hours of daylight. We were lucky to have mild, sunny days because rain and overcast days are common there. The day temperatures were mostly in the 60s.

Ireland uses the euro, currently weak against the dollar, which means good value. Since is part of United Kingdom, it uses the British pound, strong against the dollar, which means you may pay a little more than expected for some items.

Ireland is an easy country to visit. Irish people tend to be very cooperative, friendly, helpful and for the most part understanding of Americans’ driving.

Trains proved an efficient and pleasant way to travel in Ireland. For about $36 each, we bought round trip train tickets between and . Because I wanted to minimize city driving, we also took the train to Galway. While we moved between cities and towns by car and rail, what remains in my memory are wonderful walks in both city and countrySteeped in history, has a population of about half a million and another million in greater . The River Liffey runs through into the Irish Sea and sites can be divided according to which side of the river they are on. Because ‘s major sites are close to one another, walking is easy.

Bloomsday Celebration: June 16

During our days in , we visited many of the venues that Joyce references in “Ulysses.” On our first night, June 14, we had a pub dinner at Davy Byrne’s which Bloom favors as a “moral pub” and the one he chooses for lunch in “Ulysses” because he likes the atmosphere and clientele.

We began June 16 at Trinity College with a visit to the elaborate display of the illuminated manuscript featuring the Four Gospels known as the Book of Kells, which influenced the graphic aspect of “Ulysses.” The informative presentation of this Irish treasure was far different from when I saw it on my first visits to . Then one simply walked past an open page of the Book of Kells, with no charge and few visitors. We then wandered around Trinity College, stopping at the fine zoological museum.

In the afternoon, we stopped at Davy Byrne’s for the Bloomsday celebration before proceeding to a “Ulysses” reading in Meeting Square in the Temple Bar area,
the north face body warmer Ireland trip blends history
an area with pubs and small shops. The Booker Prize winning Irish novelist Anne Enright gave a wonderful reading of the “Calypso” episode of “Ulysses.” Several people were dressed in costume, notably one man who was a perfectly attired James Joyce with a monocle and several couples dressed as Bloom and his wife, Molly.

South of the Liffey

The Fitzwilliam Hotel, across from St. Stephen’s Green, and near lively Grafton Street, provided a splendid starting point for exploring most of the major sites. St. Stephen’s Green is a well cared for park. During two walks there, we saw swans and a blue heron as well as memorial statues of Irish literary and historical luminaries.

In addition to Trinity College, among the important sites south of the Liffey are the National Library of Ireland (Kildare Street). The library has two permanent literary exhibits, an elaborate one on Yeats with recorded readings of some of his poems, along with a small but fine one on Joyce. The library also offers an historical exhibit on Ireland’s role in World War I when Ireland was still part of the British empire; this exhibit will be on display until 2018.

On the same street is the National Museum of Ireland, which has three locations in and one in County Mayo. The branch on Kildare Street calls itself Archeology but includes some history. The other branches are Decorative Arts and History at Collins Barracks and Natural History at Merrion Street. The County Mayo location at Castlebar features Irish Country Life.

The National Gallery of Ireland (Merrion Square) is under renovation but is displaying some of the collection’s treasures, including its paintings by Vermeer and Caravaggio.

One should not miss the Chester Beatty Library (within the Castle compound, Dame Street), which has an elegant and beautifully displayed collection of rare manuscripts, decorative arts and other treasures from various cultures, including European, Islamic and East Asian.

Also on the south side of the Liffey are two splendid Church of Ireland cathedrals located close to one another. (St. Mary’s, on the north side of the Liffey, serves as the Catholic Cathedral.) St. Patrick’s Cathedral is Ireland’s largest church (St. Patrick’s Close). Equally if not more impressive is Christ Church Cathedral (Christchurch Place), which dates from the 11th century.

North of the Liffey

With statues of Irish luminaries, O’Connell Street is something of a history lesson. Perhaps the major historical site on O’Connell Street is the Irish Post Office (the headquarters of the 1916 Easter rebellion). The now absent Nelson Pillar (similar to the one Trafalgar Square) that stood in front of the post office was blown up by Sinn Fein in 1966 because it represented the presence British imperialism in Ireland. Now the Spire of (sometimes called the Monument of Light), 398 feet high, has replaced the pillar.

Other major sites north of the Liffey are the Hugh Lane Gallery (officially the City Gallery; Charelmont House, Parnell Square), which has a fine collection of European and Irish art. Anyone interested in Irish culture should consider visiting the James Joyce Centre (35 N. Great George’s St.) which features an informative introduction to Joyce’s life and works.

We saw a performance of Sean O’Casey’s “The Shadow of a Gunman” at the historic Abbey Theatre, the Irish National Theatre, which is just north of the Liffey. Set in in the early 1920s, “The Shadow of a Gunman” makes clear how the Irish past anticipated the political violence in Northern Ireland between British Loyalists and the IRA. The production was a bit over stylized for a play that O’Casey intended to be harshly realistic, but was nevertheless compelling theater.
the north face body warmer Ireland trip blends history

the north face recon Ireland To Face Canada In Rugby World Cup Opener

That is the same Toronto venue where Ireland ended their summer tour in mid June with a six try 40 14 win over the Canadians.

Canada’s second triumph over the Americans followed last weekend’s 27 9 victory in Charleston to give the home side a 40 20 aggregate verdict, booking their place at the next World Cup.

They will be line up in Pool D as the Americas 1 qualifiers, alongside Ireland, France, Italy and the yet to be confirmed Europe 2 qualifiers.

Canada will face Ireland at the Millennium Stadium on September 19, Italy on September 26 at Elland Road in Leeds, France on October 1 at Stadium MK in Milton Keynes, before wrapping up the pool against the Europe 2 qualifiers on October 6 at Leicester City Stadium.

Yesterday’s defeat does not spell the end of USA’s chances of making it to England 2015. A much improved performance will breed confidence as Mike Tolkin’s side progress to face Uruguay home and away for the right to claim the Americas 2 place.

Canada captain Aaron Carpenter said: “It is an amazing feeling to know that we will be there proudly representing Canada at the Rugby World Cup.

“It caps an incredible year with more Test matches and Pacific Nations Cup inclusion and I am sure it will boost rugby interest here. I am really proud of the guys.”

It was fitting that the North America Caribbean Rugby Association (NACRA) IRB Regional Association should deliver the first qualified team to England 2015.

The global process kicked off in the region last year with Mexico playing host to Jamaica. By its completion, some 3,000 players from 80 Unions across every continent will have participated in the 184 matches that comprise the 2015 Rugby World Cup qualifying programme.
the north face uk Ireland To Face Canada In Rugby World Cup Opener

the north face redpoint jacket Iraqis on edge of Mosul face a deadly dilemma

People gather as aid is being distributed at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

A boy plays with a rope as he stands atop a makeshift convenience store at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

Two youths wait for aid packages to arrive at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

A boy queues in order to receive an aid package at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

A girl sits on a pile of mattresses at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

A boy waits for customers as he sells snacks at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

A boy carries mattresses at a camp for displaced families in Dibaga, near Mosul, Iraq, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016. The campaign to retake Mosul comes after months of planning and involves more than 25,000 Iraqi troops, Kurdish forces, Sunni tribal fighters and state sanctioned Shiite militias. It is expected to take weeks, if not months, to drive Islamic State militants out of Iraq’s second largest city, which is still home to more than a million people.(AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic) Marko Drobnjakovic

Bayda Muhammad Khalaf followed the government’s advice to stay in her home with her husband and seven children as Iraqi troops advanced near their remote village outside militant held Mosul. But after Islamic State fighters fled and Iraqi troops didn’t appear, their tiny supply of food quickly ran out, and the family had to flee to search for territory firmly under government control.

When the Mosul offensive began a week ago, departing ISIS fighters warned villagers to stay off the roads and surrounding fields, which the militants had mined. So Khalaf waited until she saw a passing shepherd, and then she and her family made the eight hour walk out of no man’s land behind a herd of sheep.

“We were starving,” she said. They had watched the start of the offensive on TV and thought Iraqi forces were on the way, but the troops’ progress has been slow, and Mosul’s southern approach is littered with dozens of villages, some with no more than 20 homes.

Eventually, Khalaf couldn’t produce enough breast milk for her infant daughter. “I started giving her goat’s milk, but then the goat died,” she said.

Mosul, the largest city controlled by the Islamic State, is still home to more than 1 million civilians. The government and international aid groups fear that a sudden mass exodus will overwhelm the few camps set up on its outskirts.

The massive offensive is expected to take weeks, if not months, and with supply routes cut off by the fighting, many civilians may not be able to stay in place for long. Driven by fear or hunger, many are already putting themselves in grave danger and are complicating the campaign to expel the militants from the city, which fell to ISIS in 2014.

More than 5,600 people have already fled areas near Mosul, according to the International Organization for Migration, with most heading through ISIS run territory toward the Syrian border, rather than in the direction of the advancing troops, who are converging from the north, east and south.

Camps have been set up to accommodate 60,000 people, but about 200,000 are expected to be displaced in the first weeks of the offensive. So they have urged everyone to stay put.

“We have a comprehensive plan for the evacuation of the civilians,” said Maj. Gen. Qassim al Maliki, the head of the Iraqi army’s 9th Division. “The plan is to keep them in their houses until it becomes safer.”

That means huddling indoors, often with no electricity or running water, as explosions and gunfire echo outside. Those living near the front lines are often out of reach of aid groups.

Those who somehow manage to cross the battle lines, like Khalaf’s family, face other challenges.

The Kurds have taken in hundreds of thousands of people, but Sunni Arabs, who make up most of Mosul’s population, are viewed with suspicion. When ISIS militants attacked the Kurdish controlled city of Kirkuk last week, a senior Kurdish commander immediately speculated the attackers had infiltrated the city disguised as fleeing civilians.

“Many of (the displaced civilians), I’m sure they are working with ISIS,” said Kemal Kerkuki, a commander with the Kurdish forces, known as peshmerga. He said his forces arrested one recently who confessed to being part of a sleeper cell.

In past operations against ISIS, Iraqi security forces have been accused of abuses of civilians fleeing militant held territory. Iraqi armed groups “have committed serious human rights violations, including war crimes, by torturing, arbitrarily detaining, forcibly disappearing and extrajudicially executing thousands of civilians,” the human rights group Amnesty International reported this month.

Fatima Abdullah, whose husband was detained for security screening at the Dibaga Camp this month after they fled their village near Mosul, said she understands the need for a vetting process. “I don’t blame them, it’s their right,” she said.

She said she’s able to visit her husband daily, but they are only able to see each other and speak through a chain link fence.

“They are treating us well here,” Abdullah said as some of her older children lined up to receive a hot evening meal in the school yard where they have been staying. “But we’re also scared. We don’t know what our destiny is.”

When Khalaf and her family arrived in Qayara after following the sheep out of their village, she was exhausted and her children were hungry. Two of her young daughters ate handfuls of stale rice from a pile of food that had been discarded on the side of the road. Another child started to scream and cry, begging to return home.
the north face luggage sale Iraqis on edge of Mosul face a deadly dilemma

the north face outlet online Iran Vows to Nuke Green Zone Kim Jong il Nukes Hillary Clinton TMs Pantsuit

It was one thing when she had to defend the whoremonger in chief for his infidelities with Gennifer Flowers. It was one thing when she had to defend the whoremonger in chief for his infidelities with Monica Lewinsky. Any woman suffering such public humiliation would have developed a hatred for men. And they called him Mini Mao.

The West has poured billions of dollars into North Korea in order to stop North Korea from proliferating their nuclear technology to Syria and Iran and to feed their starving men, women and children. This money has gone straight into the pocket of Kim Jong il who has used it to buy Saddam Style palaces with swimming pools and slides and beautiful young blonde virgins and yachts and bullets to execute the bible carrying nuns. Blowing up the world to get your knob stroked is one thing Mini Mao, but you do not, ever, insult the wardrobe of the First Lady and Secretary of State of the United States of America and live to tell about it.

Kim Jong il supplied the nuclear technology and long range missiles to Iran. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on behalf of Ayatollah Khamenei has vowed to wipe Israel off the map, again today. How does the Ayatollah plan to wipe an entire country off the face of the earth with paintballs? It’s not that Mahmoud is just a figurehead consigliore for Khamenei, but yesterday Mahmoud was forced to fire his new vice president and machetanim because he called Israel a friend of Iran a couple of years ago. Iran does not recognize Israel, possibly because of the Hasid costumes.

In ancient Rome the people worshipped the Emperor as one of the Gods. In North Korea religion has been banned and the people must worship Kim Jong il as God. This week the God of North Korea called Hillary Clinton “a pensioner going shopping” in her pantsuit. World War I was caused by the shot heard round the world. At this rate nuclear world war III, the Apocalypse, may be caused by the insult heard round the world.

When was the last time that Kim Jong il appeared on Mr. bases in the Gulf including the Green Zone.

Hillary Clinton said that Mini Mao was “like a small child or an unruly teenager demanding attention.” Kim Jong il called the first lady “stupid”, but Hillary Clinton knows the story about the boy who cried wolf. Are North Korean jockeys midgets or just really short people? Why do dictators hate women who tower over them?

Today the Revolutionary Guards’ Leader, another Khamenei puppet, again threatened to incinerate Israel. The bored shepherd boy entertained himself by crying out “Wolf!” The villagers ran to rescue him but found out that he was a liar. In October 2007 Kim Jong il at the six party talks agreed to dismantle North Korea’s nuclear program. In 2000, Kim Jong il, a self professed internet addict asked Secretary of State Madeline Albright for her email address when she visited Pyongyang.

Kim loves to read about himself on the internet and this may be the reason for his daily threats against the United States, South Korea and Japan. Last week Kim threatened the Japanese California Roll industry. When the boy and the flock were actually attacked by wolves the villagers ignored the shepherd’s cries.

The people of the United States are now in a state of confusion. The United States attacked Iraq several decades ago on the basis that Saddam had nukes. George Bush was the boy who cried wolf. Now the American people do not trust their own leaders nor their own senses. They doubt that North Korea has nukes even though they just tested another one. Scott Peck, in “People of the Lie”, “the lies of the wicked are endless and obvious”. North Korea is building nuclear bombs and missiles and selling them to Iran and Syria. Iran is building nuclear bombs and plans to provide them to their armies Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in Palestine.

Perhaps the United States would have more credibility in ending nuclear proliferation if George Bush had not agreed to sell nuclear reactors to India and Saudi Arabia. The Earth, our home, is a tiny ball flying through space and the winds of our own nuclear bombs will blow the radioactive fallout right onto the heads of the American boys and girls, the ones not hit directly in the green zone. Hell hath no fury like a shepherdess scorned.
the north face ladies Iran Vows to Nuke Green Zone Kim Jong il Nukes Hillary Clinton TMs Pantsuit

the north face size chart Iran and North Korea in his State of the Union

“In the past, we have foolishly released hundreds of dangerous terrorists, only to meet them again on the battlefield including the ISIS leader, al Baghdadi.

“Today I’m keeping another promise. I just signed an order directing Secretary Mattis. to reexamine our military detention policy and to keep open the detention facilities at Guantnamo Bay.

“I am also asking the Congress to ensure that, in the fight against ISIS and al Qa’ida, we continue to have all necessary power to detain terrorists wherever we chase them down.”

Afghanistan”Our warriors in Afghanistan also have new rules of engagement. Along with their heroic Afghan partners, our military is no longer undermined by artificial timelines, and we no longer tell our enemies our plans.”

Israel”Last month I also took an action endorsed unanimously by the Senate just months before: I recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

“Shortly afterwards, dozens of countries voted in the United Nations General Assembly against America’s sovereign right to make this recognition. In 2016, American taxpayers generously sent those same countries more than $20 billion in aid.

“That is why, tonight, I am asking the Congress to pass legislation to help ensure American foreign assistance dollars always serve American interests, and only go to friends of America, not enemies of America.”

Iran”When the people of Iran rose up against the crimes of their corrupt dictatorship, I did not stay silent. America stands with the people of Iran in their courageous struggle for freedom.

“I am asking the Congress to address the fundamental flaws in the terrible Iran nuclear deal.”

North Korea”No regime has oppressed its own citizens more totally or brutally than the cruel dictatorship in North Korea. North Korea’s reckless pursuit of nuclear missiles could very soon threaten our homeland.

“We are waging a campaign of maximum pressure to prevent that from happening. Past experience has taught us that complacency and concessions only invite aggression and provocation. I will not repeat the mistakes of past administrations that got us into this dangerous position.
the north face bag Iran and North Korea in his State of the Union

the north face gilets Ipswich’s Norwich Road to face an extra fortnight of roadworks

The work near Norwich Road bridge is being undertaken by infrastructure company Cadent which is replacing a gas main.

The junctions of Cromer Road, Kelvin Road and Lister Road on to Norwich Road have been closed and there are three way traffic lights controlling vehicles and causing serious rush hour delays.

The roads should have been reopened last weekend and the lights should go by February 12. But the work has now been extended. The roads will not now reopen until February 19 and the lights will not go until February 26.

A spokesman for Cadent said there had been engineering challenges to overcome.

He said: “Unfortunately the work is taking longer than originally expected due to engineering complications with the job.

“Originally we had hoped to insert the new pipes into the old gas mains, a technique we regularly use and which requires minimal digging and can consequently be done quickly.

“However the special resin which has been used to fix gas leaks on the pipe over the years has taken up approximately 25 per cent of the mains diameter which has made inserting the new pipes impossible.

“Therefore we have had to dig open trenches in which to lay the new gas pipes.

“We did bring in a special trenching machine to try and speed up the digging of the trench however Norwich Road is very robustly constructed with reinforced concrete under the asphalt.

“This wore out the 24 cutting teeth on the machine after only 5metres so we have had to revert to using larger machines than usual to dig the trenches and this is a very slow process.

“We’re sorry for any inconvenience people may be experiencing as a result of our extended work and we’re doing everything we can to complete the work as soon as possible though the challenging conditions on the ground may cause further delays.”
the north face resolve Ipswich's Norwich Road to face an extra fortnight of roadworks