the north face coats sale billionaire owner says he plans to sue Trump

“The president stole your land,” reads an overlay on Patagonia’s website posted Monday afternoon. “This is the largest elimination of protected land in American history.”The California based retailer has long been known for its environmental activism, but this week’s political stance and a promise by its founder to sue the Trump administration represents a shift, experts say, in how corporations are speaking up, not just on behalf of their executives and employees, but also their customers.”This is a sea change in activism like nothing I’ve ever seen,” said Leslie Gaines Ross, chief reputation strategist at public relations firm Weber Shandwick. “CEOs are not just raising flags anymore, they’re actually taking action and asking their customers to do the same.”REI said on its website it would “continue to advocate for the places we all love,” and urged its Twitter followers to change their profile photos to an icon that says “We [heart] our public lands.” The North Face, meanwhile, announced it is donating $100,000 to develop a Bears Ears Education Center, and encouraged customers to contribute to a Kickstarter campaign to create it. As of Tuesday afternoon, it had raised nearly $124,000 from 1,700 people.Together as a community,
the north face longhaul 30 billionaire owner says he plans to sue Trump
we need to put our money and our time where our hashtags are,” the company said. “Together, let’s build something real.”Trump said on Monday that would cut 2 million acres in public land as part of an effort to “reverse federal overreach.” Bears Ears, which was established a year ago by President Barack Obama, would be slashed by 85 percent, while Grand Staircase Escalante, established in 1996 by President Bill Clinton, would be cut by nearly half.”Some people think that the natural resources of Utah should be controlled by a small handful of very distant bureaucrats located in Washington,” he said at a rally in Salt Lake City. “And guess what? They’re wrong.””They don’t know your land, and truly, they don’t care for your land like you do,” he added. “But from now on, that won’t matter.”Yvon Chouinard, who founded Patagonia in 1973, begs to differ. The billionaire owner, who has spent the past four decades building a company focused on environmental issues and worker well being, says he plans to take legal action against Trump.”I’m going to sue him,” Chouinard told CNN. “It’s a shame that only 4 percent of American lands are national parks. We need more,
the north face longhaul 30 billionaire owner says he plans to sue Trump
not less. This government is evil and I’m not going to sit back and let evil win.”